In September 2020, the Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) wrote to Queensland councils advising that it was aware that council employees were performing ‘professional engineering services’ without being an RPEQ and it believed this may amount to ‘corrupt conduct’ under the Crime and Corruption Act 2001 (in addition to being in breach of the Professional Engineers Act).

Paxton Booth, Executive Director, Corruption Strategy, Prevention and Legal at the CCC joined us for a PW-TV session to discuss the following:

  • What is corrupt conduct?
  • When can carrying out professional engineering services, without being registered, amount to corrupt conduct?
  • What does the CCC do when it receives a complaint about this type of conduct?

The recording is accessible in the IPWEAQ Knowledge Centre (members, please log-in to access or join IPWEAQ for access). 

The CCC prepared a Fact Sheet to assist our sector with understanding obligations under the Crime and Corruption Act 2001, available on the IPWEAQ website.

Subsequently, the Professional Engineers Act 2002 (the Act) was amended giving the Board of Professional Engineers of Queensland (BPEQ) greater investigative powers including:

  • the ability to conduct compliance audits; and 
  • provide for greater investigatory powers including the power to enter places, search and seize evidence, and request a broader range of evidence.

These powers are effective 1 March 2021. 

Kylie Mercer, Registrar BPEQ, and Craig Mills, Senior Investigator BPEQ presented on these new investigate powers on PW-TV. The recording is accessible in the IPWEAQ Knowledge Centre (members, please log-in to access or join IPWEAQ for access). 

For more information about the obligations of councils and RPEQs in relation to professional engineering services, please contact:

Juliet Schaffer, Learning and Assessment Coordinator | 07 3632 6822